Italian Courses

 

Winter 2020

Winter 2020

ITAL101 Beginners' Italian I Sections

Introduction to the essentials of Italian vocabulary, expressions, grammar and cultural life. Focus on listening, reading, speaking and writing skills in everyday situations in the present tense. Aligned with CEFR level A1 objectives.

Course type: Hybrid A hybrid course may involve a combination of synchronous activities (done in "real time") and asynchronous activities (done in one's own time). The course will be delivered online. [accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] Beginners' Italian I The Italian 101 course, an introductory-level language and culture course, will allow students to acquire some basic grammatical structures and learn about a number of interesting cultural topics, including Italian society, visual arts and architecture, music, and art cities. To help practice and develop all four-language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) this course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach. In particular, the purpose of Italian 101 is to help students gain some proficiency in communicating in a variety of survival situations, such as talk about themselves, their family, their interests and their daily routine, address different people, describe people and places they are familiar with and express likes and dislikes. Students...
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ITAL102 Beginners' Italian II Sections

Continuation of foundational elements of Italian language. Development of listening, reading, speaking and writing skills in the context of everyday situations in the present and past tenses. Aligned with CEFR level A1 objectives.

Course type: Hybrid A hybrid course may involve a combination of synchronous activities (done in "real time") and asynchronous activities (done in one's own time). The course will be delivered online. [accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] Beginners' Italian II Building on Italian 101, the Italian 102 course helps students develop all four language skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking) and gain a beginner level of proficiency in interacting in Italian and communicating in situations, such as discuss people and events in the students' life, in the present and from the past, talk about their childhood or memorable trips; address different people; ask for directions and order in a restaurant; express likes and dislikes and make plans for the weekend and other occasions. The course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach and students participate in a variety of engaging and fun activities. Students will be asked to do many activities and...
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ITAL201 Elementary Italian I Sections

Introduction to complex language structures used to communicate in a variety of situations by using different tenses and modes. Enhanced ability to comprehend, interact and express wishes or feelings in common personal and social contexts. Aligned with CEFR level A2 objectives.

Course type: Hybrid A hybrid course may involve a combination of synchronous activities (done in "real time") and asynchronous activities (done in one's own time). The course will be delivered online. [accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Term 1" style="accordion-style1"] Elementary Italian I Italian 201 (3) and Italian 202 (3) are the second-year continuation of Italian 102. The primary aim of the courses is to consolidate students’ oral and written proficiency, to improve their reading and comprehension skills and to promote their awareness of Italian culture. To serve that purpose, the courses are complemented by an interactive approach to the review of the main Italian grammatical points, an introduction to and discussion on cultural topics, such as stereotypes on Italian people and on Italy, Italian society, Made in Italy, principles in Italian cuisine, sport and health. Both courses are based on the guidelines provided by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. In particular, upon successful completion...
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ITAL202 Elementary Italian II Sections

Expansion of fundamental notions and presentation of elaborate structures, present, past and future tenses and different modes. Enriched opportunities to explore Italian culture and develop intercultural skills. Aligned with CEFR level A2 objectives.

Course type: Hybrid A hybrid course may involve a combination of synchronous activities (done in "real time") and asynchronous activities (done in one's own time). The course will be delivered online. Elementary Italian II Italian 202 (3) is a continuation of Italian 201 and is conducted according to the same format. It naturally builds on Italian 201 and includes additional communicative, reading, writing and listening activities as well as new cultural topics. This course is based on the guidelines provided by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages for A2 language level. More specifically, upon successful completion of Italian 202 course, students “communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters and can describe in simple terms aspects of their background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.” The various evaluation methods which include peer reading exercises, 2-stage oral exams, peer writing, blogs...
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ITAL301 Intermediate Italian I Sections

Advanced grammar structures in context, lexical repertoire and cultural elements to further increase learners ability to communicate in most situations, including complex conversations. Aligned with CEFR level B1 objectives.

Course type: Hybrid A hybrid course may involve a combination of synchronous activities (done in "real time") and asynchronous activities (done in one's own time). The course will be delivered online. Intermediate Italian I ITAL 301 è un corso di lingua e cultura di livello intermedio o ‘di soglia,’ che prepara a diventare studenti indipendenti o in grado di muoversi con disinvoltura nelle diverse situazioni che possono presentarsi quando si viaggia in Italia. Lo studente che raggiunge con successo la fine del corso è in grado di “esprimere esperienze ed avvenimenti, sogni, speranze e ambizioni e di spiegare brevemente le ragioni delle sue opinioni e dei suoi progetti,” come descritto nel livello B1 del Quadro comune europeo di riferimento per la conoscenza delle lingue. L’approccio globale su cui si fonda questo corso, consente allo studente di rivedere ed approfondire gli aspetti morfosintattici della lingua così come quelli pragmatici, conversazionali, lessicali e socioculturali. Attraverso l’uso...
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ITAL302 Intermediate Italian II Sections

Expansion of and reflection on the use of complex grammatical structures in context to broaden lexical repertoire. Enhances proficiency through written communication and discussion of relevant cultural topics. Aligned with CEFR level B1 objectives.

Course type: Hybrid A hybrid course may involve a combination of synchronous activities (done in "real time") and asynchronous activities (done in one's own time). The course will be delivered online. Intermediate Italian II ITAL 302 sviluppa ulteriore le competenze linguistiche e culturali degli studenti e li prepara a raggiungere e completare il livello intermedio o B1, come descritto nel Quadro comune europeo di riferimento per la conoscenza delle lingue straniere. Gli studenti comprendono ora le idee principali di testi complessi su argomenti sia concreti sia astratti; sono in grado di interagire con fiducia e spontaneità con i parlanti nativi e sanno produrre un testo chiaro e dettagliato su un’ampia gamma di argomenti e spiegare un punto di vista su un argomento fornendo i pro e i contro delle varie opzioni. L’approccio globale su cui è basato Ital 302 (e Ital 301), utilizza una varietà di generi testuali e lingua orale. Le diverse aree...
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ITAL304 Italian Literature and Culture of the Modern and Contemporary Age Sections

The development of modern and contemporary Italian literature and culture against the background of social and historical events. Alternates with ITAL 303.

[Cross-listed with ITST232] Italian Food Cultures Italy is world-renowned for its food cultures and Italians put great care into food preparation, consumption, and appreciation. It’s no wonder that Italian food-related themes permeate the country’s cultural life and beyond. This course will examine representations of Italian or Italian-derived foodways and the role they play in articulating larger issues concerning contemporary Italy, including regionalism, anti-globalization, family history, gender and sexual identities, Italian American food, tourism in Italy, and immigration to Italy. Students will form a complex picture of Italy’s relationships with food cultures in a global context. Class assignments and final projects will allow students to explore their critical and/or creative views of class materials. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Italian. But it requires a passion for Italian food and culture! Required readings: TBA Prerequisite: None Language of instruction: English Course Registration  
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ITAL401 Upper-Intermediate Italian I Sections

Continues building fluency, accuracy and proficiency at an autonomous level in spoken and written communication. Emphasis on culturally contextualized grammar structures and vocabulary, critical reading and discussion of a variety of texts. Aligned with CEFR level B2 objectives.

Course type: Hybrid A hybrid course may involve a combination of synchronous activities (done in "real time") and asynchronous activities (done in one's own time). The course will be delivered online. Advanced Studies in Italian Language and Style I This course is designed for those students who wish to review and develop their communicative competence in Italian. From the starting point of nonfictional texts, students will examine and discuss contemporary issues in their social and cultural context. The focus will be on the language we use to communicate in daily life and in the media. We will pay particular attention to Italian TV, radio broadcasts and commercials, together with lyrics of hit songs and news. Objectives: To recognize the close link between economic development and social and cultural growth, both in its general rules and local variations; to consider cultural differences, both diachronically and synchronically; to recognize the interference between different codex and languages...
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ITAL404 Italian Literature of the Middle Ages Sections

Italian literature of the Middle Ages in its intellectual, socio-political and cultural context. Dante and his contemporaries and/or immediate followers (may include Petrarch and Boccaccio). Precludes credit for ITST 414.

[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 414 and Romance Studies 420C] Think Like a Forest: A Dialogue Between Pre-Modern Worldviews, Environmental Humanities, Indigenous Knowledge How do we think? Are we aware of the kind of thinking we entertain? What kind of world do our individual and collective, conscious or unconscious thought-processes generate? Do we even have a choice in the orientation of our thinking patterns, and if we do, does it matter to know we can choose how to think? Recent scientific research on plants and forests has shown that plants are dynamic, ever-evolving creatures that know how simultaneously to respond to their own inner pattern while remaining adaptive to the environment; that know how to grow in resilience and flexibility by developing a vast web of relations, both visible and invisible. In becoming who they are, plants also generate and foster complex ecosystems around them: they support communities of deeply interconnected yet also wildly...
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Winter 2020

ITST110 "Made in Italy" Sections

Where do Italy's glamour, lifestyle, traditions come from? This course introduces Italy's multifaceted ways of being and the cultural creations of the peninsula in their context.

Made in Italy: Creativity at the Service of Form, Aesthetics and Beauty What do you know about Italian fashion, design, art & architecture in Italy and the world, now and across the ages? In this course, we will explore what makes Italian creativity and style highly recognizable across the globe, how these distinctive cultural traits came about and what they teach us about the power of form, aesthetics and beauty at a local and transnational level. A journey into the Italian art of living that starts from the first handbook on manners and etiquette (The Book of the Courtier by Baldassare Castiglione, 16th century) and ends with the legacy of contemporary star architects (Aldo Rossi, Renzo Piano, Stefano Boeri), star designers (Ettore Sottsass, Gio Ponti, Gae Aulenti), luxury furniture brands (Marioni, Smania, Opera Contemporary) and fashion global leaders (Prada, Armani, Gucci). The language of instruction is English. No prior knowledge is required....
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ITST232 Introduction to Italian Culture II: From the Modern to the Post-Colonial Age Sections

The debate around nation vs. empire vs. republic, from the Napoleonic age to our days, as captured in Italy's microcosm, condensing and often anticipating issues that have later become global.

[Cross-listed with ITAL 304] Italian Food Cultures Italy is world-renowned for its food cultures and Italians put great care into food preparation, consumption, and appreciation. It’s no wonder that Italian food-related themes permeate the country’s cultural life and beyond. This course will examine representations of Italian or Italian-derived foodways and the role they play in articulating larger issues concerning contemporary Italy, including regionalism, anti-globalization, family history, gender and sexual identities, Italian American food, tourism in Italy, and immigration to Italy. Students will form a complex picture of Italy’s relationships with food cultures in a global context. Class assignments and final projects will allow students to explore their critical and/or creative views of class materials. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Italian. But it requires a passion for Italian food and culture! Required readings: TBA Prerequisite: None Language of instruction: English Course Registration
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ITST333 Masterpieces of the Novella in Italian Literature Sections

A study of the genre of the novella as an expression of social and political contexts within and across cultures from its inception in feudal times to the post-modern age.

In Search of "Italianness" through Novellas A journey into the hearts and minds of Italians through the reading of seven novellas. These works show how, when and where Italians are  at their best, worst, and most authentic. Like a feature film, the “novella” (longer than a short story but shorter than a novel) can be enjoyed in just one sitting.  Hence, the never-ending interest for a literary genre that dates back to Boccaccio and the Italian Renaissance. Thanks to its brevity, concrete symbolism and focus on character exploration, the novella is ideal for examining the cultura­l traits underpinning the notion of Italianness. At the end of the course, students will be better equipped to  interpret contemporary Italy and the multifarious, highly fragmented, and viscerally regional character of its citizens. The course is taught in English by Dr. Arianna Dagnino, a creative writer and literary translator who worked for twenty years as an international reporter before re-entering academia....
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ITST345 Italian Fascism in Interdisciplinary Perspective Sections

The cultural, literary, philosophical roots of Fascism and its evolution: its policies in literature, sports, cinema, architecture, racial legislation, and colonial adventures.

[Cross-listed with RMST 222] Types and Archetypes of Fascism in the Age of the Crisis of Liberal Democracy This course aims at offering students with diverse backgrounds some foundational knowledge about the phenomenon of “xxx-ism” as, in successive incarnations, it arose and ran its course in the context of neo-Latin societies and cultures. Since the phenomenon originated in Italy, our primary focus will be the Italian peninsula. We will read Neville and make references to Bosworth, Mack Smith, Martin Clark, Procacci and other contemporary historians and sociologists. We will analyze works of theory, politics, fiction and memoirs from that age (by Marinetti, Moravia, Pirandello, Ungaretti, Carlo Levi); examine the architecture and fine arts of Mussolini's regime; and watch clips from films belonging to the genres of telefoni bianchi comedy (Camerini's Il Signor Max), war propaganda (Balbo's transatlantic flights, Rossellini's The White Ship) and historical “peplum” kolossals (Gallone's Scipio the African). Ultimately, the goal of...
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ITST377 Cultural Exchange between Modern Italy and China Sections

Key moments and texts about intercultural exchange between Italy and China since the beginning of the twentieth century in their social, historical, and political contexts.

Cultural Exchange between Modern Italy and China Since Marco Polo, Italy’s communication with China has been the longest in Europe on written record. In the 20th century, increased mobility intensified cultural exchanges between the two countries. Leading Italian writers such as Italo Calvino continued to imagine Polo’s legacy, making him a main character in his postmodern masterpiece, Invisible Cities (1972). During the early 1970s Cultural Revolution (1966-76), Italy was among the first Western countries to establish diplomatic relations with Maoist China. During that time, prominent intellectuals, including Michelangelo Antonioni and Alberto Moravia, went there to witness the famous social engineering. The 1940s Italian neorealist cinema significantly influenced Six-generation Chinese filmmakers, including Wang Xiaoshuai in the 1990s-2000s. Since the 1980s, Italy has been the leading country in continental Europe to receive Chinese migrants, a phenomenon that led to significant media coverage and debate to the present day. This course will examine these events...
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ITST385 Italian Cinema: Neorealism Sections

A survey of the major classics of post-WWII Italian Neorealism in cinema emphasizing their historical, political, social, philosophical and technical contexts.

From Rossellini to Fellini: Neorealism and its Legacy in Italian Cinema In the rubble-strewn world of the immediate post-Second World War period, the films by Rossellini, Visconti, De Santis and De Sica (and the scripts by Zavattini) amounted to a landmark event and established Italian Neorealism as a worldwide cause célèbre. This artistic movement, exemplary both in aesthetic achievements and ethical commitment, proved to reverberate durably in time. It influenced successive waves of younger Italian filmmakers who later became great auteurs in their own right; and it travelled widely in space, with an enormous impact on filmmakers the world over. The topics covered are the following. Before the midterm: General intro to the class; Italian cinema under Fascism; Rossellini: Rome Open City (1945); Rossellini: Paisan (1946); Visconti: The Earth Trembles (1948); Rossellini: Stromboli (1949). After the midterm: De Sica: Bicycle Thieves (1948); De Santis: Bitter Rice (1949); De Sica: Umberto D. (1952); Lattuada:...
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ITST414 Topics in the Italian Literature and Culture of the Middle Ages in Translation Sections

Italian literature of the Middle Ages in its intellectual, socio-political and cultural context. Dante and his contemporaries and/or immediate followers (may include Petrarch and Boccaccio). Precludes credit for ITAL 404.

[Cross-listed with Italian 404 and Romance Studies 420] Think Like a Forest: A Dialogue Between Pre-Modern Worldviews, Environmental Humanities, Indigenous Knowledge How do we think? Are we aware of the kind of thinking we entertain? What kind of world do our individual and collective, conscious or unconscious thought-processes generate? Do we even have a choice in the orientation of our thinking patterns, and if we do, does it matter to know we can choose how to think? Recent scientific research on plants and forests has shown that plants are dynamic, ever-evolving creatures that know how simultaneously to respond to their own inner pattern while remaining adaptive to the environment; that know how to grow in resilience and flexibility by developing a vast web of relations, both visible and invisible. In becoming who they are, plants also generate and foster complex ecosystems around them: they support communities of deeply interconnected yet also wildly diverse...
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ITST419 Topics in Modern and Contemporary Italian Literature and Culture in Translation Sections

Italian literature of the 20th century in its intellectual, socio-political and cultural context. Precludes credit for ITAL 409.

Italian Masculinities in Literature and Cinema This course offers an overview of diverse Italian masculinities as they are represented in Italian literature and culture. What did it and does it mean to be a man in Italy? How did diverse concepts of Italian manhood come into being? How have they been constructed and distributed in literary and cinematic texts? What do these texts tell us about Italian society? And how have these male types been challenged within the Italian cultural domain? We will probe these questions by studying the depictions of Italian virilities in memoirs, novels, public speeches, news articles, films, and television programs from the 18th century to the present, with a focus on the 20th century. Male archetypes and ideals to be scrutinized include the self-made man, the strongman, the fascist new man, nationalist soldiers, the inetto (schlemiel), the Latin Lover, libertines, and gay men. To delve further into...
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