French Courses

 

Winter 2019/20

Winter 2019

FREN101 Beginners' French I Sections

Basic vocabulary, the rudiments of grammar and familiarization with cultures of the French-speaking world. This course is aligned with level A1 objectives of the CEFR.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] A continuation of the A1 level work begun in FREN 101 and its journey into the French language and around the Francophone world. With an approach that is communicative and collaborative, and inductive and interactive, the course develops understanding and the mobilisation of knowledge as savoir-faire. French grammatical structures studied include: common verbs in past and future tenses, reflexive verbs, personal and relative pronouns, and comparatives. These will be applied in practice through: listening: understanding everyday communication about yourself, your family, and your immediate and concrete environment reading: understanding familiar vocabulary in simple communicative structures; such as advertisements, signs, menus speaking: asking questions for information or about familiar or everyday topics, and engaging with others in simple conversation using simple sentences and expressions to describe places, people, objects, and concepts writing: short descriptions and narratives; making comparisons and discussing cultural differences; giving advice...
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FREN102 Beginners' French II Sections

A continuation of FREN 101. This course is aligned with level A1 objectives of the CEFR.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] A continuation of the A1 level work begun in FREN 101 and its journey into the French language and around the Francophone world. With an approach that is communicative and collaborative, and inductive and interactive, the course develops understanding and the mobilisation of knowledge as savoir-faire. French grammatical structures studied include: common verbs in past and future tenses, reflexive verbs, personal and relative pronouns, and comparatives. These will be applied in practice through: listening: understanding everyday communication about yourself, your family, and your immediate and concrete environment reading: understanding familiar vocabulary in simple communicative structures; such as advertisements, signs, menus speaking: asking questions for information or about familiar or everyday topics, and engaging with others in simple conversation using simple sentences and expressions to describe places, people, objects, and concepts writing: short descriptions and narratives; making comparisons and discussing cultural differences; giving advice...
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FREN111 Elementary French I Sections

Continued improvement in listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course is aligned with level A2 objectives of the CEFR.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] A low intermediate course for non-specialists, focused on the discovery and appreciation of diverse aspects of francophone culture, based on printed documents, audio-visual material and the Internet. If you are unsure whether this is the appropriate level of French course for you, click here. Required text: TBA Prerequisite: One of FREN 11, FREN 102 or equivalent Note: Not available for credit to students with FREN 12, FREN 112 or equivalent. The sequence of French language courses FREN101/102, 111/112, 122/123, 224/225 is designed for non native speakers. The Department of FHIS reserves the right to refuse enrollment to any of its language courses to a student who has, in the view of the Department, a level of competence unsuited to that course. Enrollment at or below the level the student has already attained is not permitted. Course registration [/accordion] [accordion title="Course Description - Winter" style="accordion-style2"] Elementary French I A...
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FREN112 Elementary French II Sections

A continuation of FREN 111. This course aligned with level A2 objectives of the CEFR.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] FREN 112 is the continuation of FREN 111: A low intermediate course for non-specialists, focused on the discovery and appreciation of diverse aspects of francophone culture, based on printed documents, audio-visual material and the Internet. If you are unsure whether this is the appropriate level of French course for you, click here. Required text: Course materials will be available on-line. Prerequisite: FREN 111 or equivalent Note: Successful completion of FREN 112 satisfies the Faculty of Arts Language Requirement. Not available for credit to students with FREN 12. Course Registration [/accordion] [accordion title="Course Description - Winter" style="accordion-style2"] Elementary French II A continuation of the A2 level work begun in FREN 111, focused on the understanding of detached sentences and expressions related to everyday life (such as personal and familial information, regular purchases, one’s immediate environment including home, community and workplace). French grammatical structures such as uses of pronouns, the future...
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FREN122 Intermediate French I Sections

Refinement of reading, writing and speaking skills through the study of contemporary literature and other authentic documents of the French-speaking world. This course is aligned with level B1 objectives of the CEFR.

Intermediate French I Refinement of writing and reading, speaking and listening skills through diverse activities: an interactive approach to the review of French grammar, stressing communicative competence; an emphasis on one’s opinion on different topics (work and studies, leisure activities, travel and news); a study of contemporary literature and other authentic documents (newspapers, blogs, music, etc.) of the French-Speaking world; an introduction to essay-writing in French. The FREN 122 syllabus follows the Common European Framework of Reference guideline for B1.1 level. Three hours a week will be devoted to providing students with tools for dealing with situations that they are likely to encounter in a French speaking region. Students will be able to understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar subjects in work, school and leisure activities; to produce a simple and cohesive text on familiar subjects or subjects of personal interest and to narrate an event or an experience. Lectures...
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FREN123 Intermediate French II Sections

A continuation of FREN 122. This course is aligned with level B1 objectives of the CEFR.

Intermediate French II French 123 is a continuation of French 122: a refinement of reading, speaking and listening skills with additional emphasis on techniques of writing through diverse activities: an interactive approach to the review of French grammar, stressing communicative competence; an emphasis on expressing one’s opinion on different topics (work and studies, literature, arts and news): a practical application of strategies for essay-writing in French; a study of contemporary literature and other authentic documents (newspapers, blogs, music, etc.) of the French-Speaking world. The FREN 123 syllabus follows the Common European Framework of Reference guidelines for the B1.2 level. Three hours a week will be devoted to providing students with tools for dealing with most situations that they would likely encounter in a French speaking region. Students will be able to produce structured and connected texts on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or related to documents read inside and outside of...
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FREN220 Introduction to Early French Literature and to Textual Analysis Sections

Students will familiarize themselves with techniques of literary analysis, as applied to representative works from the Middle Ages to the 17th century, including theatre, fiction, poetry and non-fiction prose. To be taken by all students intending to proceed to the Minor, Major or Honours program.

Introduction to Early French Literature and to Textual Analysis Le désir

“Le désir est l’essence même de l’homme.” Baruch Spinoza, 1677

“Tous les hommes sont des êtres de soupir et de désir, d'inquiétude et d'espérance.” Henri-Frédéric Amiel, 1873

Dans ce cours nous abordons différents aspects du désir -- désirs assouvis, mais le plus souvent inassouvis -- dans des oeuvres littéraires du Moyen Âge jusqu’à l’Âge Classique (le XVIIe siècle). Les textes qui nous lisons représentent, en effet, parmi les plus belles expressions d’amour, de soupir, d’inquiétude, d’espérance et d’angoisse. Textes: Annie Colognat-Barès (éd.), Anthologie de la poésie française de Villon à Verlaine Marie de France, Le Lai de Lanval Jean Racine, Phèdre + textes supplémentaires de Michel de Montaigne Blaise Pascal. Prerequisite: FREN 123 or assignment based on placement test. Note: To be taken by all students intending to proceed to the Minor, Major or Honours program in French. Language of Instruction: French Course Registration
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FREN221 Introduction to Modern Literature written in French and to Textual Analysis Sections

Students will familiarize themselves with techniques of literary analysis, as applied to representative works from the 18th century to the present, including theatre, fiction, poetry and non-fiction prose. To be taken by all students intending to proceed to the Minor, Major or Honours program.

Introduction to Modern Literature written in French and to Textual Analysis Identités Nationales Dans ce cours nous nous proposons d’examiner les singularités et les complexités de l’identité nationale telles qu’exprimées dans divers textes littéraires depuis le XVIIIe siècle et la Révolution française jusqu’au présent. Que les textes datent du XVIIIe siècle ou du XXIe, chacun nous permet une réflexion sur la question posée par Ernest Renan en 1885: “Qu’est-ce qu’une nation?” autant que sur la question impliquée par celle-là: qui fait partie de la nation? Par la même occasion ces textes nous offrent un survol des grands mouvements de la littérature française du XVIIIe au XXIe siècles et une introduction à quelques textes francophones. Textes: Montesquieu. Lettres persanes (extraits) Claire de Duras. Ourika. Guy de Maupassant. Boule de suif. + choix de textes. Prerequisite: FREN 123 or assignment based on placement test. Note: To be taken by all students intending to proceed to the Minor, Major or Honours program in French. Language...
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FREN222 French Language and Style I Sections

Grammar, vocabulary, composition, language in context.

French Language and Style I In-depth grammatical analysis of the simple French sentence and its components, to enable students to understand the language better and to write it more clearly and idiomatically. Written work will include both structural exercises and short writing assignments. Required texts: Course package (UBC Bookstore) Recommended texts: Le Nouveau Petit Robert, Dictionnaire alphabétique et analogique de la langue française. Robert-Collins, English-French French-English Dictionary. Stacey Katz Bourns, Contextualized French Grammar, Heinle Cengage Learning. Prerequisite: FREN 123 Language of instruction: French Course Registration
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FREN223 French Language and Style II Sections

Grammar, vocabulary, composition, language in context.

French Language and Style II In-depth grammatical analysis of the complex French sentence and its components, to enable students to understand the language better and to write it more clearly and idiomatically. Written work will include both structural exercises and short writing assignments. Required texts: Course package (UBC Bookstore) Recommended texts: Le Nouveau Petit Robert, Dictionnaire alphabétique et analogique de la langue française. Robert-Collins, English-French French-English Dictionary. Stacey Katz Bourns, Contextualized French Grammar, Heinle Cengage Learning. Prerequisite: FREN 222 Language of instruction: French Course Registration
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FREN224 Upper-Intermediate French I Sections

Communicative proficiency at an autonomous level: vocabulary enrichment, pronunciation practice, grammatical analysis and development of efficient reading and writing techniques. This course is aligned with level B2 objectives of the CEFR.

Upper-Intermediate French I FREN 224 is an upper intermediate language class that aims to refine the skills acquired in Intermediate French I & II or equivalent courses and to enhance students’ knowledge of French and the Francophone world. The course uses an interactive approach to the review of French grammar, stressing communicative competence and is focused on: the understanding of concrete or abstract topics in a complex text (oral or written); the production of clear and detailed oral and written communication on a number of subjects (construction of arguments to defend one’s opinion, explain one’s viewpoint); the ability to correct one’s own mistakes (when speaking or writing); vocabulary building, grammatical accuracy and socio-cultural competency using a wide variety of contemporary authentic documents (newspaper articles, videos, literary excerpts, blogs, music, etc.) of the French-Speaking world. The FREN 224 syllabus follows the Common European Framework of Reference guidelines for the B2.1 level. Three hours a week...
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FREN225 Upper-Intermediate French II Sections

A continuation of FREN 224. This course is aligned with level B2 objectives of the CEFR.

Upper-Intermediate French II The course uses an interactive approach to the review of French grammar, stressing communicative competence and is focused on: the understanding of concrete or abstract topics in a complex text (oral or written); the production of clear and detailed oral and written communication on a number of subjects (construction of arguments to defend one’s opinion, explain one’s viewpoint); the ability to correct one’s own mistakes (when speaking or writing); vocabulary building, grammatical accuracy and socio-cultural competency using a wide variety of contemporary authentic documents (newspaper articles, videos, literary excerpts, blogs, music, etc.) of the French-Speaking world. The FREN 225 syllabus follows the Common European Framework of Reference guidelines for the B2.2 level. Three hours a week will be devoted to providing students with tools for interacting with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers possible without strain for either party. Students will be able...
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FREN328 Selected Works of African and Caribbean Literature Sections

Representative works from different genres, viewed in their historical, social, and cultural contexts.

Instructor(s): Miller, Robert
Domination and Resistance: African and Caribbean Literatures in History After centuries of relatively peaceful coexistence, the siege of Ceuta (in Morocco) by the Portuguese prince Henry the Navigator in 1415 marks the beginning of an aggressive and acquisitive European approach to its continental neighbor Africa that was to last to the present day and that would leave both continents as well as the Americas profoundly and irrevocably changed. Both African and Caribbean literatures written in French, though rich and varied in perspective and approach, can only be understood in relation to the background of this seismic global change. The novels (and one play) chosen for this course reflect the historical, social, political, juridical and cultural issues as well as the literary imagination that have grown out of patterns of domination, oppression and resistance in this historical context. They occupy, test and contest the boundaries of race, class, gender and ethnicity and suggest...
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FREN330 Selected Works of Quebecois Literature Sections

Representative works viewed in their historical, social, and cultural contexts.

Instructor(s): Lamontagne, André
Selected Works of Quebecois Literature Ce cours propose un choix de textes représentatifs de l'évolution la littérature québécoise depuis son récit de fondation jusqu'à l’époque contemporaine. Nous nous intéresserons plus particulièrement à l'émergence d'une littérature nationale et à ses transformations esthétiques et identitaires à travers l’étude d’œuvres appartenant à différents genres. Required books: Yves Thériault, Agaguk (1958) Marie-Claire Blais, Une saison dans la vie d'Emmanuel (1966) Guillaume Vigneault, Chercher le vent (2001) Wajdi Mouawad, Incendies (2003) Other texts: Relation originale du voyage de Jacques Cartier au Canada en 1534 (extrait) Abbé Casgrain, ‘‘Le mouvement littéraire en Canada’’ (extrait, 1866) Michèle Lalonde, “Speak White” (1968) Recommended books: Beaudoin, Réjean. Le roman québécois. Montréal : Boréal. 1991 Biron, Michel et al. Histoire de la littérature québécoise. Montréal : Boréal. 2007. Dictionnaire des œuvres littéraires du Québec  Montréal : Fides, 8 tomes (1980-2011). Prerequisite: One of FREN 220, FREN 221. Language of instruction: French Course Registration
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FREN334 French Civilization II Sections

A historically based approach to French civilization and culture from the Third Republic to the present, completed by a thematic study of contemporary French culture.

Instructor(s): Laroussi, Farid
Exploring French Society after 1945 Engaging with history, culture, politics and intellectual life in contemporary France, this course crafts visions to understand key aspects of French society. We seek out to examine radical transformations through three specific cultural clusters. The first one addresses the Algerian War and the massive political, institutional and cultural upheavals that it brought along. Then, we move to France's integration into the European Union, and the many challenges, notably around identity, sovereignty, citizenship, and globalization. Lastly, the course focuses on the French brand of feminism, what defines and confronts it on political and cultural grounds. For example, rethinking gender, labor division, or laïcité. The course uses fiction works, films, and  essais to explore the vast area of ideas that shape France's modernity. Students are expected to develop skills in cultural analysis as well as criticl reading and composition. In French. Required readings: Laurens, Camille. Celle que vous croyez (2016) Mauvignier,...
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FREN346 French at Work Sections

Communicative French for students preparing for a career in the francophone world. Not available for credit toward a Minor, Major, or Honours degree in French. Language of instruction is French. This course is aligned with the B1 objectives of the CEFR.

French at Work This course provides learners functional and communicative linguistic skills to be able to work in a French speaking environment. The course presents grammar in context and terminology and will introduce the learners to cultural aspects related to business in the French speaking world. This course will encourage an interactive team work structure (on going on-line forum discussions and interaction with the Francophone business community in British Columbia), student-centered work (on-line exercises to learn terminology, to review grammar in context and to develop listening comprehension skills) and task based (final project) Every week the students work on the four language skills through terminology building, writing process, peer-editing, oral comprehension and oral production. Example of weekly tasks: reading, analysis and discussion of weekly topic, interaction with peers in the on-line forum related to weekly topic (2 postings min), completion of on-line exercises on weekly grammar in context, terminology and listening comprehension, participation in-class...
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FREN348 French Literature from the Middle Ages to the Revolution (in English) Sections

A study of French literature through reading and analysis of translated works.

Instructor(s): Moran, Patrick
[Cross-listed with Medieval Studies 301] The Grail Quest: Myth, Mystery and Romance From Tennyson to Indiana Jones and The Da Vinci Code, much has been written and imagined about the Grail, but the earliest appearances of this mysterious artifact in medieval French literature are sometimes overlooked. This course is an opportunity to return to the great 12th and 13th century romances that first introduced the Grail and helped define it for subsequent generations. Though the Grail is usually described today as the cup from which Christ drank at the Last Supper, early Grail romances are less clear on the matter. Chrétien de Troyes' seminal Story of the Grail (c. 1180-1190) never quite explains the nature of the strange artifact that Perceval, a naive young man barely knighted by king Arthur, encounters during his adventures. In seeking to solve the mysteries left by Chrétien's unfinished tale, however, his continuators and imitators built the Grail into an explicitly Christian relic,...
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FREN353 French Grammar Sections

Systematic study of the fundamental principles of French grammar.

Instructor(s): Rouget, Christine
Grammaire française Le Français 353 est le cours de grammaire traditionnelle le plus avancé du programme.  Son objectif est d’approfondir et de renforcer les connaissances grammaticales des étudiants, mais aussi de leur enseigner comment utiliser une grammaire de référence. Le cours abordera l’analyse grammaticale traditionnelle (nature et fonction des mots, analyse dite « logique » des propositions) et permettra la familiarisation avec les outils de référence par le biais de problèmes choisis (tels les pronoms relatifs et interrogatifs, le gérondif, l’accord du participe, etc.).  Les travaux pratiques comprendront non seulement les exercices à trous et exercices structuraux bien connus, mais aussi des exercices de production de phrases, de réécriture de passages (par exemple, passer d’un style familier à un style soigné), des exercices d’analyse grammaticale, des commentaires sur l’utilisation d’une construction donnée et des exercices de repérage de structures, fautives ou non.  Les étudiants seront ainsi amenés à exercer et à améliorer...
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FREN355 Advanced Composition Sections

Development of essay writing skills in French.

Instructor(s): Simpson, Anne
Français écrit Ce cours vise à améliorer les compétences rédactionnelles des étudiants de français langue seconde en les exposant à des textes représentatifs de différents genres. Le cours propose une exploration des notions théoriques, des outils de langue et des techniques rédactionnelles nécessaires à l’écriture du résumé, du texte expressif, narratif, argumentatif, du compte rendu critique et du commentaire composé. L’observation de textes sera accompagnée d’exercices d’amélioration du lexique, de stratégies d’autocorrection, de techniques de planification et de rédaction. Tout au long du trimestre, les étudiants mettront en pratique les notions essentielles à l’amélioration de l’écrit en combinant l’observation de stratégies lexicales, de techniques d’organisation dans des textes authentiques et l’application de ces procédés et de leurs effets de sens dans la rédaction de leurs propres textes. L’organisation du cours est basée sur la production individuelle ainsi que la production de travaux de groupes conçus autour de projets dans lesquels les étudiants auront...
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FREN370 Introduction to French Linguistics Sections

A survey of basic terminology, methods, problems, and theoretical trends in French linguistics, specifically designed to provide students with a foundation for advanced language study in French.

Instructor(s): Curat, Hervé
Introduction à la linguistique française Le cours se présente comme une familiarisation avec la terminologie mais surtout avec les principaux concepts de la linguistique française contemporaine. Il s’agit d’étudier les principales méthodes ainsi que les principaux outils utilisés en linguistique française; de parcourir les différents champs couverts par la description linguistique : phonétique / phonologie, lexicologie, morphologie, syntaxe; et enfin de présenter les différents domaines de la linguistique représentés dans la section française du département. Textes: Le recueil de notes distribué en classe est divisé en trois parties : la synthèse du cours, les lectures et les exercices.  Dans la synthèse du cours, vous trouverez dans des cadres à double bordure un jeu de renvois vers les exercices et les lectures. Ouvrages de référence à consulter: Arrivé, Michel, Gadet, Françoise & Galmiche, Michel (1986) La Grammaire d’aujourd’hui : guide alphabétique de linguistique française, Paris : Flammarion. Ducrot, Osvald & Todorov, Tzevan (1972) Dictionnaire encyclopédique des sciences du langage, Paris : Seuil. Grevisse,...
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FREN371 Introduction to French Literary Theory and Methodology Sections

A survey of basic terminology, methods, problems, and theoretical trends in French literary criticism, specifically designed to provide students with a foundation for advanced study of literature in French.

Instructor(s): Frelick, Nancy
Introduction à la théorie et aux méthodes critiques en littérature française Qu’est-ce que la littérature? Pourquoi s’y intéresser? Comment en parler? Ce cours propose de revenir sur les réponses à la fois variées et complexes que la théorie littéraire a voulu donner à ces questions apparemment simples. À partir d’une sélection d’articles représentatifs de diverses tendances critiques, nous procéderons à un survol des principales approches qui ont marqué l’étude de la littérature depuis la fin du 19e siècle. Suivant un premier arrêt sur les enjeux de l’histoire littéraire et de la méthode positiviste, nous verrons quelques-unes des approches théoriques issues du formalisme et de la linguistique qui ont contribué au renouveau de la discipline au cours des dernières décennies. Nous tenterons de démystifier les principales questions soulevées par le structuralisme, la narratologie, la sociocritique, la psychocritique, les théories de la réception, la critique féministe et la critique postcoloniale. Combinant exposés et exercices pratiques,...
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FREN416B Studies in French Literature since 1900 - FR LIT SINC 1900 Sections

Shades of Truth and Fiction in Contemporary French Literature Contemporary literature is not easily grasped. It is constantly unfolding, leaving us, its readers, little time to map the field and little distance to judge what will become the emblematic works of our era. While this uncertainty may seem daunting, contemporary literature offers us unique opportunities to gain a complex understanding of present-day events, perspectives, taboos, and obsessions. One notion that has come to define our times is that of truth. We are tasked, urgently, to seize what it may be and how it can be ascertained. Paradoxically, literature may contribute some of the most crucial reflections on the boundaries of truth. Indeed, writers of fiction have an intimate grasp on all shades of the real and of its representation. This appears remarkably salient in contemporary French literature, as it plays endlessly with nuances of the self, of testimony, of objectivity. In this...
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FREN418K Studies in African and/or Caribbean Literatures of French Expression - AFRC/CARRIBN LIT Sections

An advanced course in francophone literature. Topics include francophone literary movements, postcolonial studies, and critical readings of literary works from Africa and the Caribbean.

Instructor(s): Laroussi, Farid
Francophonie or Postcolonial Studies? Francophonie hides more than it reveals, is this why we need to approach the subject via the Postcolonial Studies framework? This course develops around a conceptual toolkit (universalism, hybridity, feminisms, diglossia, transnationalism, etc.) to get a better understanding of vision and division around language, identity, memory, national imaginary, and so forth. The works studied reflect on the problematics of the youngest generation of francophone writers. At the same time, course assignments facilitate practice with critical thinking (emphasis on participation), reading reports, exposés, and a research project. In French. Required readings: Bachi, Salim. Amours et aventures de Sindbad le marin (2010) Confiant, Raphaël. Eau de café (1991) Miano, Léonora. La saison de l'ombre (2013) Slimani, Leïla. Chanson douce (2016) Recommended readings: Badran, Margot. Feminists, Islam, and Nation (1996) Bhaba, Homi. The Location of Culture (1994) Césaire, Aimé. Discours sur le colonialisme (1950) Combe, Dominique. Littératures francophones. Questions, débats, polémiques (2010) Confiant, Raphaël. Éloge de la créolité (1989) Fanon, Frantz. Peau...
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FREN419A Studies in Women's Writing - STDY WOMEN WRTS Sections

Instructor(s): Frelick, Nancy
Écrits de femmes (French Women Writers) Dans ce cours, nous examinerons un éventail de textes écrits par des femmes à travers les siècles (des récits allégoriques du Moyen Âge jusqu’à l’autofiction du vingtième siècle) en nous penchant particulièrement sur la représentation des femmes et de l’écriture, ainsi que la réception de ces textes par le lectorat.  Nous aurons lieu de nous demander s’il existe une « écriture féminine »  qui se distinguerait d’une « écriture masculine », selon les genres choisis, les thèmes, les considérations stylistiques. Ouvrages au programme : Christine de Pizan, Le Livre de la cité des dames (extraits) Marguerite de Navarre, L’Heptaméron (extraits) Madame de Lafayette, La Comtesse de Tende. Isabelle de Charrière, Trois femmes. George Sand, Gabriel. Marguerite Duras, L’Amant. Un choix de textes et d'ouvrages critiques sera distribué en classe. Prerequisite: One of FREN 320, FREN 321, FREN 328, FREN 329, FREN 330 Language of Instruction: French Course Registration
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FREN420A Selected Topics in French Literature and Culture - TPCS FREN LIT Sections

Course content will vary. May be taken up to 3 times, with different content, for a maximum of 9 credits.

Les imaginaires de Paris De toutes les grandes villes du monde, Paris est l’une de celles qui a le plus inspiré l’imaginaire. Mille fois représentée par la littérature, les arts et le cinéma, Paris a fait l’objet d’une production discursive et graphique abondante qui a contribué à l’ériger en véritable « mythe moderne ». Cette représentation mythique de Paris, construite au fil des romans, des poèmes, des chansons, des peintures, des photographies et des films qui l’ont pris pour sujet, continue encore aujourd’hui de teinter le regard, tantôt nostalgique, tantôt critique, que l’on porte sur la capitale française. Derrière la ville-musée et la ville-clichée qui figure sur les cartes postales se trouve une ville qui évolue à un rythme qui n’est pas nécessairement celui de ses représentations. Ce cours propose d’étudier et d’interroger l’héritage discursif et symbolique de Paris tel qu’il s’est construit et transmis depuis le XIXe siècle. À travers l’étude d’œuvres littéraires...
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FREN427A Studies in Cinema - STDY IN CINEMA Sections

Cinéma français Ce cours a pour objectif d’initier les étudiant(e)s à l’histoire du cinéma français, du début du siècle dernier jusqu’à nos jours, en fonction de ses grandes lignes d’évolution esthétique et idéologique. En guise d’introduction, nous aborderons les principales étapes qui ont marqué le cinéma français avant 1945: l’âge d’or du cinéma muet, la naissance et les premiers classiques du cinéma parlant, le réalisme poétique de la fin des années 1930, le cinéma sous l’Occupation et à l’époque de la Libération. Cela fait, nous aborderons le cinéma de la Nouvelle vague et celui des années 1960, 1970 et 1980. Finalement, nous consacrerons la dernière partie du cours à l’étude des principaux aspects de la cinématographie française plus contemporaine. Lecture obligatoire: Prédal, René. 2013. Histoire du cinéma français. Des origines à nos jours. Nouveau Monde Editions. Lectures recommandées: Prédal, René. 2008. Le cinéma français depuis 2000. Paris : Armand Colin. Bertin-Maghit, Jean-Pierre. 1994. Le cinéma...
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FREN470A Studies in Modern French Linguistics - MODRN FR LING Sections

Instructor(s): Winder, William
La rhétorique des textes et des images Un mot peut en cacher un autre: quand on appelle un chat un chat, il ne s'agit pas de chats -- bien que cette expression veuille dire précisément "parler sans détour". Dans de telles expressions, le sens premier et simple n'est qu'un tremplin vers un autre sens qui, lui, est celui qui compte. L'étude de ces écarts à la langue simple et directe tombe depuis l'antiquité dans le domaine de la rhétorique. Dans ce cours La rhétorique générale du Groupe Mu nous servira de guide dans notre analyse des phénomènes rhétoriques des textes et des images. Nous chercherons à comprendre ce qui rend heureuses ou malheureuses ces créations expressives. Lectures obligatoires: La rhétorique générale du Groupe Mu. Prerequisite: FREN 370 Corequisite: FREN 370 may be taken concurrently with the permission of the instructor of FREN 470. Language of instruction: French Course Registration
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FREN495 Research Seminar in French Sections

Research on critical topics related to selected literary works. Limited enrolment: required of honours, but open to majors students in French.

Instructor(s): Lamontagne, André
(Cross-listed with FREN 513A) Les nouvelles écritures romanesques Depuis la fin des années 1980, la littérature ‘post-québécoise’ – pour reprendre l’expression de Pierre Nepveu – s’est détachée du texte national dans une quête de filiations nouvelles, d’altérité identitaire et de modèles narratifs hétérogènes. Le présent séminaire a pour objet d’explorer ces parcours romanesques entre l’intertextualité subversive (La Rage), la dérive urbaine (L’hiver de pluie), l’éclatement référentiel et sexuel (La petite fille qui aimait trop les allumettes), les migrations identitaires et l’écriture diasporique (Ru), et le récit insulaire de l’extraterritorialité (Au péril de la mer). Au-delà de l’impossibilité de revenir à un récit commun, la littérature québécoise est-elle le lieu de nouvelles convergences de l’imaginaire, d’une reconfiguration de son espace narratif et de sa mémoire ? Textes à l’étude: Louis Hamelin, La rage (1989) Lise Tremblay, L’hiver de pluie (1990) Gaétan Soucy, La petite fille qui aimait trop les allumettes (1998) Kim Thúy, Ru (2009) Dominique Fortier,  Au péril...
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FREN499 Honours Essay Sections

Honours Essay Required of all Honours candidates, the Honours Essay represents an extended personal research project (in finished form usually about 35-40 pages typewritten) carried out under the supervision of two members of the Department's Graduate Faculty: a supervisor who will meet regularly with the student and a second reader. Preliminary research on the topic chosen is expected to be completed by mid-term, at which time the candidate is required to submit for approval a detailed outline of the projected work. The finished essay is due on the last day of lectures of the term. The Honours Essay is seen less as an original contribution to knowledge than as a means for providing the student with an opportunity to become familiar with the methodological problems of research as well as with the techniques and problems of scholarly writing. Students who are planning to do an Honours Essay must submit a proposal to the...
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FREN501B Studies in Medieval French Literature - MEDIEVAL FR LIT Sections

Instructor(s): Moran, Patrick
La fantasy et son double médiéval La fantasy entretient des rapports ambigus avec le Moyen Âge : nombreux sont les auteurs qui revendiquent une inspiration médiévale, qu’elle soit littéraire, folklorique ou historique, mais cette inspiration est parfois plus fantasmée que réelle, plutôt que de se fonder dans une connaissance directe des textes ou de l’histoire de la période. De plus, un roman de fantasy n’est pas un roman historique : l’univers de fiction qu’il déploie invoque le Moyen Âge sur le mode analogique, sans se soumettre nécessairement à une exigence de fidélité documentaire. La revendication de l’inspiration médiévale, enfin, peut jouer le rôle d’une stratégie de légitimation, typique d’un genre littéraire qu’on classe généralement dans les fictions dites « populaires » ou « de masse ». La fantasy, à tous ces points de vue, est la dernière incarnation du médiévalisme, cette mode médiévale multiforme et changeante qui parcourt les cultures occidentales, par phases, depuis l’époque romantique, en...
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FREN511A Studies in Contemporary French Literature - CONTEMP FR LIT Sections

Instructor(s): Laroussi, Farid
Qu’est donc devenue la littérature française? Dans ce cours nous aborderons la question de l’écriture littéraire comme fait culturel français, comment ce paradigme a évolué au cours du XXème siècle à nos jours, et quels sont les enjeux de cette évolution. Un aspect clé de notre approche tournera autour de la tension entre éthique (l’histoire des idées contemporaines sur comment nous devrions vivre) et esthétique (notamment les questions relatives à l’expérience et à la représentation). Autre dimension thématique dans cette évolution, nous étudierons le discours sur le corps ou comment la langue littéraire donne forme, et ce à un âge de distinctions identitaires (sexe, psychanalyse, autobiographie, etc.). Enfin, et par la tangente, nous parlerons du rôle de la critique pour savoir si au XXème siècle elle peut être considérée comme un genre littéraire de plein droit. Oeuvres au programme par ordre chronologique Proust, Marcel. Du côté de chez Swann (1913) Gracq, Julien. Le rivage...
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FREN512A Studies in Literary Criticism - LIT CRITICISM Sections

Instructor(s): Zhang, Gaoheng
The Art of Eloquence: Theories and Practices [cross-listed with SPAN501-101] The course studies key works on the art of eloquence in the West, from ancient Greece and Rome, through Renaissance and Enlightenment Italy, to modern-day European-American-Canadian academia. Known as rhetoric, eloquence is the art of communication, motivation, and persuasion, which was theorized by influential thinkers (from Aristotle and Cicero to McLuhan and Barthes), and which was a mandatory discipline both for European elites up until the 19th century and for students of public speaking and composition in our time. Rhetoric’s concerns with content and form, knowledge and its communication, the speaker and the audience, as well as the ethics of means and ends remain central to the humanities today. The course will examine eloquence for three primary purposes. First, we will examine rhetoric’s relationships with umbrella topics such as motivation, education, ethics, gender, science, the media, and transculturation, as well as probe how...
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FREN513A Studies in French-Canadian Literature - FR CANADIAN LIT Sections

Instructor(s): Lamontagne, André
(Cross-listed with FREN 495-101) Les nouvelles écritures romanesques Depuis la fin des années 1980, la littérature ‘post-québécoise’ – pour reprendre l’expression de Pierre Nepveu – s’est détachée du texte national dans une quête de filiations nouvelles, d’altérité identitaire et de modèles narratifs hétérogènes. Le présent séminaire a pour objet d’explorer ces parcours romanesques entre l’intertextualité subversive (La Rage), la dérive urbaine (L’hiver de pluie), l’éclatement référentiel et sexuel (La petite fille qui aimait trop les allumettes), les migrations identitaires et l’écriture diasporique (Ru), et le récit insulaire de l’extraterritorialité (Au péril de la mer). Au-delà de l’impossibilité de revenir à un récit commun, la littérature québécoise est-elle le lieu de nouvelles convergences de l’imaginaire, d’une reconfiguration de son espace narratif et de sa mémoire ? Textes à l’étude: Louis Hamelin, La rage (1989) Lise Tremblay, L’hiver de pluie (1990) Gaétan Soucy, La petite fille qui aimait trop les allumettes (1998) Kim Thúy, Ru (2009) Dominique Fortier,  Au péril...
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FREN521A Studies in Francophone Literatures and Cultures - LIT FR-SPKG WRLD Sections

Mémoire et marginalité dans les littératures africaines et caribéennes

 « Pieds de danseur sacré, mains-archives, mains-écriture, à quelle page de notre grand livre vierge ouvert se trouveront les mots : liberté, libération et justice ? Premiers mots de ma carte d’identité. »                                       - Carte d’identité de J.-M. Adiaffi

Ce cours se propose d’étudier le rapport entre les expériences de déplacement et d’hybridité, la remise en question des notions d’identité ethnique et raciale, et la mémoire traumatisante de l’Afrique et de sa diaspora. Le personnage marginalisé qu’on retrouve souvent dans les textes littéraires africains et caribéens concentre les problèmes d’une conscience identitaire en crise, le souvenir d’une histoire oppressive et un travail d’élaboration mémorielle : apprend-on de prime abord à être Africain-dans-le-monde, ou plutôt à être ce qu’Édouard Glissant appelait « Tout-monde » ? Ainsi se croisent constamment les exigences et défis de la diasporisation, un métissage personnel et collectif inévitable, les échos d’un enracinement ancien, souvent imaginaire, et...
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FREN566B Studies in French Semantics - FR SEMANTICS STD Sections

Instructor(s): Curat, Hervé
Microscopie linguistique du texte poétique: les Fables choisies de La Fontaine Le premier but du cours est de montrer aux étudiants qu’un texte même connu et en apparence simple contient, cachées dans ses structures linguistiques, des nuances et de l’information dont le lecteur n’est souvent pas conscient (bien qu’elles aient pu inconsciemment contribuer à sa lecture). Le second but sera d’amener les participants à faire eux-mêmes de telles analyses. L’approche sera avant tout pratique, le cours consistant essentiellement en une quinzaine d’analyses de fables, au début présentées par le professeur, puis menées collectivement en séminaire, et en fin de semestre présentées en exposés par les étudiants. Ce sera le travail principal. Tous les ordres de données linguistiques seront pris en compte: phonétique, mètre et rime, lexique, morphologie, syntaxe, stylistique. Les données culturelles ne seront pas pour autant délaissées: allusions et références explicites à des faits historiques, des mythes, des croyances diverses, à...
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FREN599A Master's Thesis - MASTER'S THESIS Sections

All candidates for the M.A. degree with thesis are required to deposit in the Department a thesis of approximately 80 pages, including bibliography and notes. It must be presented in accordance with the university guidelines for the format and presentation of graduate theses. Candidates will defend their thesis during a one-hour and a half oral examination. Candidates must register in French 599 in the year in which they intend to submit the thesis. For information about your thesis preparation and submission, click here.
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FREN599B Master's Thesis - MASTER'S THESIS Sections

FREN699 Doctoral Dissertation Sections

 

Summer 2019

Summer 2019

FREN101 Beginners' French I Sections

Basic vocabulary, the rudiments of grammar and familiarization with cultures of the French-speaking world.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] A continuation of the A1 level work begun in FREN 101 and its journey into the French language and around the Francophone world. With an approach that is communicative and collaborative, and inductive and interactive, the course develops understanding and the mobilisation of knowledge as savoir-faire. French grammatical structures studied include: common verbs in past and future tenses, reflexive verbs, personal and relative pronouns, and comparatives. These will be applied in practice through: listening: understanding everyday communication about yourself, your family, and your immediate and concrete environment reading: understanding familiar vocabulary in simple communicative structures; such as advertisements, signs, menus speaking: asking questions for information or about familiar or everyday topics, and engaging with others in simple conversation using simple sentences and expressions to describe places, people, objects, and concepts writing: short descriptions and narratives; making comparisons and discussing cultural differences; giving advice...
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FREN102 Beginners' French II Sections

A continuation of FREN 101.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] A continuation of the A1 level work begun in FREN 101 and its journey into the French language and around the Francophone world. With an approach that is communicative and collaborative, and inductive and interactive, the course develops understanding and the mobilisation of knowledge as savoir-faire. French grammatical structures studied include: common verbs in past and future tenses, reflexive verbs, personal and relative pronouns, and comparatives. These will be applied in practice through: listening: understanding everyday communication about yourself, your family, and your immediate and concrete environment reading: understanding familiar vocabulary in simple communicative structures; such as advertisements, signs, menus speaking: asking questions for information or about familiar or everyday topics, and engaging with others in simple conversation using simple sentences and expressions to describe places, people, objects, and concepts writing: short descriptions and narratives; making comparisons and discussing cultural differences; giving advice...
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FREN111 Elementary French I Sections

Continued improvement in listening, speaking, reading and writing.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] A low intermediate course for non-specialists, focused on the discovery and appreciation of diverse aspects of francophone culture, based on printed documents, audio-visual material and the Internet. If you are unsure whether this is the appropriate level of French course for you, click here. Required text: TBA Prerequisite: One of FREN 11, FREN 102 or equivalent Note: Not available for credit to students with FREN 12, FREN 112 or equivalent. The sequence of French language courses FREN101/102, 111/112, 122/123, 224/225 is designed for non native speakers. The Department of FHIS reserves the right to refuse enrollment to any of its language courses to a student who has, in the view of the Department, a level of competence unsuited to that course. Enrollment at or below the level the student has already attained is not permitted. Course registration [/accordion] [accordion title="Course Description - Winter" style="accordion-style2"] Elementary French I A...
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FREN112 Elementary French II Sections

A continuation of FREN 111.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer" style="accordion-style1"] FREN 112 is the continuation of FREN 111: A low intermediate course for non-specialists, focused on the discovery and appreciation of diverse aspects of francophone culture, based on printed documents, audio-visual material and the Internet. If you are unsure whether this is the appropriate level of French course for you, click here. Required text: Course materials will be available on-line. Prerequisite: FREN 111 or equivalent Note: Successful completion of FREN 112 satisfies the Faculty of Arts Language Requirement. Not available for credit to students with FREN 12. Course Registration [/accordion] [accordion title="Course Description - Winter" style="accordion-style2"] Elementary French II A continuation of the A2 level work begun in FREN 111, focused on the understanding of detached sentences and expressions related to everyday life (such as personal and familial information, regular purchases, one’s immediate environment including home, community and workplace). French grammatical structures such as uses of pronouns, the future...
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FREN122 Intermediate French I Sections

Refinement of reading, writing and speaking skills through the study of contemporary literature and other authentic documents of the French-speaking world.

Intermediate French I Refinement of writing and reading, speaking and listening skills through diverse activities: an interactive approach to the review of French grammar, stressing communicative competence; an emphasis on one’s opinion on different topics (work and studies, leisure activities, travel and news); a study of contemporary literature and other authentic documents (newspapers, blogs, music, etc.) of the French-Speaking world; an introduction to essay-writing in French. The FREN 122 syllabus follows the Common European Framework of Reference guideline for B1.1 level. Three hours a week will be devoted to providing students with tools for dealing with situations that they are likely to encounter in a French speaking region. Students will be able to understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar subjects in work, school and leisure activities; to produce a simple and cohesive text on familiar subjects or subjects of personal interest and to narrate an event or an experience. Lectures...
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FREN123 Intermediate French II Sections

A continuation of FREN 122.

Intermediate French II French 123 is a continuation of French 122: a refinement of reading, speaking and listening skills with additional emphasis on techniques of writing through diverse activities: an interactive approach to the review of French grammar, stressing communicative competence; an emphasis on expressing one’s opinion on different topics (work and studies, literature, arts and news): a practical application of strategies for essay-writing in French; a study of contemporary literature and other authentic documents (newspapers, blogs, music, etc.) of the French-Speaking world. The FREN 123 syllabus follows the Common European Framework of Reference guidelines for the B1.2 level. Three hours a week will be devoted to providing students with tools for dealing with most situations that they would likely encounter in a French speaking region. Students will be able to produce structured and connected texts on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or related to documents read inside and outside of...
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FREN599A Master's Thesis - MASTER'S THESIS Sections

All candidates for the M.A. degree with thesis are required to deposit in the Department a thesis of approximately 80 pages, including bibliography and notes. It must be presented in accordance with the university guidelines for the format and presentation of graduate theses. Candidates will defend their thesis during a one-hour and a half oral examination. Candidates must register in French 599 in the year in which they intend to submit the thesis. For information about your thesis preparation and submission, click here.
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FREN699 Doctoral Dissertation Sections