Italian Courses

 

Winter 2018/19

Winter 2018

ITAL101 First-Year Italian I Sections

Grammar, reading, writing, and oral practice for beginners without previous exposure to the Italian language or dialects.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer 2018" style="accordion-style1"] First-Year Italian I The Italian 101 course, an introductory-level language and culture course, will allow students to acquire some basic grammatical structures and learn about a number of interesting cultural topics, including Italian society, visual arts and architecture, music, and art cities. To help practice and develop all four-language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) this course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach. In particular, the purpose of Italian 101 is to help students gain some proficiency in communicating in a variety of survival situations, such as talk about themselves, their family, their interests and their daily routine, address different people, describe people and places they are familiar with and express likes and dislikes. Students will learn how to appropriately pronounce the language, read short articles and simple stories; listen and understand dialogues and songs; write a postcard, a simple email message and...
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ITAL102 First-Year Italian II Sections

Grammar, reading, writing and oral practice for beginners without previous exposure to the Italian language or dialects.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer 2018" style="accordion-style1"] First-Year Italian II Building on Italian 101, the Italian 102 course helps students develop all four language skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking) and gain a beginner level of proficiency in interacting in Italian and communicating in situations, such as discuss people and events in the students' life, in the present and from the past, talk about their childhood or memorable trips; address different people; ask for directions and order in a restaurant; express likes and dislikes and make plans for the weekend and other occasions. The course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach and students participate in a variety of engaging and fun activities. Students will be asked to do many activities and exercises in pairs and in groups. Willingness to interact in Italian and all efforts will be rewarded! Learners will read ads, email messages, and short articles or stories, and...
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ITAL201 Second-Year Italian I Sections

Reading, writing and oral practice, with constant and systematic reference to the grammatical structure of the language.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Term 1" style="accordion-style1"] Second-Year Italian I The primary aim of the courses is to consolidate students’ oral and written proficiency, to improve their reading and comprehension skills and to promote their awareness of Italian culture. To serve that purpose, the courses are complemented by an interactive approach to the review of the main Italian grammatical points, an introduction to and discussion on cultural topics, such as stereotypes on Italian people and on Italy, Italian society, Made in Italy, principles in Italian cuisine, sport and health. Both courses are based on the guidelines provided by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. In particular, upon successful completion of Italian 201 course, students “understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance such as basic personal and family information, communicate in routine tasks and describe aspects of their background, immediate environment and...
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ITAL202 Second-Year Italian II Sections

Reading, writing and oral practice, with constant and systematic reference to the grammatical structure of the language.

Second-Year Italian II Italian 202 (3) is a continuation of Italian 201 and is conducted according to the same format. It naturally builds on Italian 201 and includes additional communicative, reading, writing and listening activities as well as new cultural topics. This course is based on the guidelines provided by the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages for A2 language level. More specifically, upon successful completion of Italian 202 course, students “communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters and can describe in simple terms aspects of their background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.” The various evaluation methods which include peer reading exercises, 2-stage oral exams, peer writing, blogs or group videos are tied to overall course objectives and are meant to help the students assess their own progress in all four language skills and on their cultural...
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ITAL206 Conversational Italian for Intermediate Learners Sections

The development of spoken proficiency. Contemporary Italy will be presented and discussed through a variety of multimedia resources in this highly interactive environment.

Instructor(s): Zampieri, Elena
Conversational Italian I Italian 206 is designed to enhance communication skills and provide additional practice to improve oral expression, interaction (spoken and written) and comprehension of both listening and reading authentic material, while also increasing awareness of Italian culture. This course is geared towards students who already have a good general knowledge of fundamental grammatical concepts such as present and past tenses, imperative and conditional, and a certain ability to communicate orally and in writing, but want to improve (after Italian 201 or with instructor permission) overall and deepen their intercultural competence in particular. A range of activities in and outside class, individual and in groups, such as discussions, debates, interactive presentations, and blogs are used to increase students’ speaking skill. Some grammar topics will also be reviewed through oral practice exercises. Evaluation is based on demonstrated proficiency in oral and written communication. Some students register in this course concurrently with ITAL 202. Textbook: TBA Prerequisite:...
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ITAL301 Third-Year Italian I Sections

Reading, writing, speaking, comprehension. Special emphasis on oral practice and on composition.

Instructor(s): Canuto, Luisa
Third-Year Italian I ITAL 301 è un corso di lingua e cultura di livello intermedio o ‘di soglia,’ che prepara a diventare studenti indipendenti o in grado di muoversi con disinvoltura nelle diverse situazioni che possono presentarsi quando si viaggia in Italia. Lo studente che raggiunge con successo la fine del corso è in grado di “esprimere esperienze ed avvenimenti, sogni, speranze e ambizioni e di spiegare brevemente le ragioni delle sue opinioni e dei suoi progetti,” come descritto nel livello B1 del Quadro comune europeo di riferimento per la conoscenza delle lingue. L’approccio globale su cui si fonda questo corso, consente allo studente di rivedere ed approfondire gli aspetti morfosintattici della lingua così come quelli pragmatici, conversazionali, lessicali e socioculturali. Attraverso l’uso di testi autentici, video, fumetti ed altre attività creative e coinvolgenti il corso aiuta lo studente a sviluppare tutte le abilità linguistiche ed approfondire la conoscenza di aspetti culturali...
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ITAL302 Third-Year Italian II Sections

Reading, writing, speaking, comprehension. Special emphasis on oral practice and on composition.

Instructor(s): Zampieri, Elena
Third-Year Italian II Il corso Italiano 302 prepara gli studenti a raggiungere un livello di autonomia intermedio superiore o di livello B2, come descritto nel Quadro comune europeo di riferimento per la conoscenza delle lingue straniere. Gli studenti comprendono ora le idee principali di testi complessi su argomenti sia concreti sia astratti; sono in grado di interagire con fiducia e spontaneità con i parlanti nativi e sanno produrre un testo chiaro e dettagliato su un'ampia gamma di argomenti e spiegare un punto di vista su un argomento fornendo i pro e i contro delle varie opzioni. L’approccio globale su cui è basato Ital 302 (e Ital 301), utilizza una varietà di generi testuali e lingua orale. Le diverse aree tematiche affrontano argomenti di geografia, società, storia e arti attraverso brani letterari, video, test di valutazione e autovalutazione, e spiegazioni grammaticali, sempre rivolti ad appronfondire i differenti temi morfosintattici. Un modulo del corso...
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ITAL303 Italian Literature and Culture of the Medieval and Early Modern Period Sections

A thematic approach to Italian literary works from the origins to the end of the sixteenth century considered in a broad cultural context. Alternates with ITAL 304.

Instructor(s): Boccassini, Daniela
[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 231] Shifting Identities in Medieval and Early Modern Italy This is a course that aims at blending the visual and the literary arts that flourished in the Italian peninsula from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. We will follow a chronological order, moving from Dante to Machiavelli and Castiglione, from Giotto to Leonardo and Raphael. However, this order also reflects a geographical one, as different centers of patronage became prominent at different moments in time. We will therefore look at Palermo and Sicily during the 12th and 13th centuries, Florence and Tuscany from the 13th to the 16th, Milan-Venice in the 15th and 16th; finally, approaching the Rome of the Renaissance will also give us the opportunity to look at her ancient, classical heritage. We will read excerpts from some of the major texts that were produced in these various areas, and familiarize ourselves with the evolution of the visual...
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ITAL304 Italian Literature and Culture of the Modern and Contemporary Age Sections

The development of modern and contemporary Italian literature and culture against the background of social and historical events. Alternates with ITAL 303.

Instructor(s): Zhang, Gaoheng
[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 232] Colonial and Postcolonial Italy Often considered the “least of the Great Powers” by its European colonial counterparts, Italy had expansionist ambitions since its Unification in 1861. At its peak during fascism, the Italian Empire annexed parts of Libya, Greece, Albania, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Somalia, in addition to a concession in Tianjin, China. But soon after WWII, the Italian public forgot about this history. Not until the 1990s when historians began to explore Italy’s colonial past. But so far Italians have not fully incorporated the country’s imperial history and its legacy into public discourse. Why did this amnesia occur? And what implications did it have for today’s multiethnic Italian society, particularly when the country has been experiencing a Mediterranean refugee crisis and a surge of migrant entrepreneurship in its vibrant sector of small- and medium-sized enterprises? In addressing these questions, students will discuss mobility, gender, and race in relation...
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ITAL404 Italian Literature of the Middle Ages Sections

Italian literature of the Middle Ages in its intellectual, socio-political and cultural context. Dante and his contemporaries and/or immediate followers (may include Petrarch and Boccaccio). Precludes credit for ITST 414.

Instructor(s): Boccassini, Daniela
[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 414 and Romance Studies 420C] Romance Ecologies: Narcissism, The Waste Land and Feminine Wild Wisdom This course aims at reflecting on the ways in which intuitive wisdom and linear thinking played out on the Medieval Romance scene, while improving our understanding of Medieval worldviews pertaining to the interaction between human societies and the ecosystems in which they were operating. In our readings of Medieval and Early Renaissance texts — whether chivalric narratives, love poems, philosophical treatises — and images we will also probe the extent to which, and the possible reasons why, intuitive wisdom consistently seems to bear the mark of the feminine, as a yearning for wholeness that typically, and paradoxically, exceeds institutionalized forms of knowledge and spirituality. We will carry out this investigation by keeping in mind today's ecological concerns and the way in which current ecological thinking may be enriched and enlivened by the contribution...
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Winter 2018

ITST110 Introduction to Italian Literature and Culture Sections

Instructor(s): Zhang, Gaoheng
Italian Culture and the Wider World What does it mean to be Italian? What does Italy stand for? This course surveys post-WWII Italian culture through two parts titled “Italian Mobilities” (emigration, immigration, travel, colonialism) and “Made in Italy” (fashion, design, neorealist cinema, gastronomy). We will learn Italian culture's local specificity and its influence on other parts of the world, as well as how world events shaped Italian culture. The language of instruction is English. No prior knowledge is required. Students from any discipline are welcome. Required readings: A list of readings and videos will be included on the syllabus for this course. Prerequisite: None Language of instruction: English Course Registration
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ITST231 Introduction to Italian Culture I: From the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period Sections

Instructor(s): Boccassini, Daniela
[Cross-listed with Italian 303] Shifting Identities in Medieval and Early Modern Italy This is a course that aims at blending the visual and the literary arts that flourished in the Italian peninsula from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. We will follow a chronological order, moving from Dante to Machiavelli and Castiglione, from Giotto to Leonardo and Raphael. However, this order also reflects a geographical one, as different centers of patronage became prominent at different moments in time. We will therefore look at Palermo and Sicily during the 12th and 13th centuries, Florence and Tuscany from the 13th to the 16th, Milan-Venice in the 15th and 16th; finally, approaching the Rome of the Renaissance will also give us the opportunity to look at her ancient, classical heritage. We will read excerpts from some of the major texts that were produced in these various areas, and familiarize ourselves with the evolution of the visual arts. If...
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ITST232 Introduction to Italian Culture II: From the Modern to the Post-Colonial Age Sections

Instructor(s): Zhang, Gaoheng
[Cross-listed with Italian 304] Colonial and Postcolonial Italy Often considered the “least of the Great Powers” by its European colonial counterparts, Italy had expansionist ambitions since its Unification in 1861. At its peak during fascism, the Italian Empire annexed parts of Libya, Greece, Albania, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Somalia, in addition to a concession in Tianjin, China. But soon after WWII, the Italian public forgot about this history. Not until the 1990s when historians began to explore Italy’s colonial past. But so far Italians have not fully incorporated the country’s imperial history and its legacy into public discourse. Why did this amnesia occur? And what implications did it have for today’s multiethnic Italian society, particularly when the country has been experiencing a Mediterranean refugee crisis and a surge of migrant entrepreneurship in its vibrant sector of small- and medium-sized enterprises? In addressing these questions, students will discuss mobility, gender, and race in relation to...
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ITST234 Introduction to Italian Cinema Sections

Instructor(s): Testa, Carlo
[Cross-listed with Romance Studies 234] The Humane Comedy: Educational Laughter in Contemporary Italian Cinema By harnessing laughter to the illustration of major social, economic, or political issues of its day, the commedia all’italiana has contributed to fostering a better informed, more humane humanity, and in the process has set an example that ought to be held up as a mirror of ethical commitment (not to mention artistic accomplishment and box-office success) for cultures across the world. Hence the title of this course — The Humane Comedy: Educational Laughter in Contemporary Italian Cinema. The topics covered are the following. Before the midterm: the politics of early post-Fascist Italy and the paradigms of neorealism (e.g. De Sica’s Bicycle Thieves, 1948); Pietro Germi’s Divorce, Italian Style (1961); Elio Petri’s The Working Class Goes to Heaven (1971); Franco Brusati’s Bread and Chocolate (1973). After the midterm: Ettore Scola’s We All Loved Each Other (1974); Maurizio Nichetti’s Icicle Thieves...
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ITST333 Masterpieces of the Novella in Italian Literature Sections

A study of the genre of the novella as an expression of social and political contexts within and across cultures from its inception in feudal times to the post-modern age.

In Search of Italianness through Novellas A journey into the hearts and minds of Italians through the reading of seven novellas. These works show how, when and where Italians are at their best, worst, and most authentic. Like a feature film, the “novella” (longer than a short story but shorter than a novel) can be enjoyed in just one sitting. Hence, the never-ending interest for a literary genre that dates back to Boccaccio and the Italian Renaissance. Thanks to its brevity, concrete symbolism and focus on character exploration, the novella is ideal for examining the cultural traits underpinning the notion of Italianness. At the end of the course, students will be better equipped to interpret contemporary Italy and the multifarious, highly fragmented, and viscerally regional character of its citizens. Students will analyze Italian novellas through in-class discussions and take-home assignments. In order to stimulate classroom discussion and provide useful insight into the wide variety of...
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ITST345 Italian Fascism in Interdisciplinary Perspective Sections

The cultural, literary, philosophical roots of Fascism and its evolution: its policies in literature, sports, cinema, architecture, racial legislation, and colonial adventures.

Instructor(s): Testa, Carlo
[Cross-listed with Romance Studies 222] Types and Archetypes of Fascism in the Age of the Crisis of Liberal Democracy This course aims at offering students with diverse backgrounds some foundational knowledge about the phenomenon of “xxx-ism” as, in successive incarnations, it arose and ran its course in the context of neo-Latin societies and cultures. Since the phenomenon originated in Italy, our primary focus will be the Italian peninsula. We will read Neville and make references to Bosworth, Mack Smith, Martin Clark, Procacci and other contemporary historians and sociologists. We will analyze works of theory, politics, fiction and memoirs from that age (by Marinetti, Moravia, Pirandello, Ungaretti, Carlo Levi); examine the architecture and fine arts of Mussolini's regime; and watch clips from films belonging to the genres of telefoni bianchi comedy (Camerini's Il Signor Max), war propaganda (Balbo's transatlantic flights, Rossellini's The White Ship) and historical “peplum” kolossals (Gallone's Scipio the African). Ultimately, the goal...
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ITST385 Italian Cinema: Neorealism Sections

Instructor(s): Testa, Carlo
From Rossellini to Fellini: Neorealism and its Legacy in Italian Cinema In the rubble-strewn world of the immediate post-Second World War period, the films by Rossellini, Visconti, De Santis and De Sica (and the scripts by Zavattini) amounted to a landmark event and established Italian Neorealism as a worldwide cause célèbre. This artistic movement, exemplary both in aesthetic achievements and ethical commitment, proved to reverberate durably in time. It influenced successive waves of younger Italian filmmakers who later became great auteurs in their own right; and it travelled widely in space, with an enormous impact on filmmakers the world over. The topics covered are the following. Before the midterm: General intro to the class; Italian cinema under Fascism; Rossellini: Rome Open City (1945); Rossellini: Paisan (1946); Visconti: The Earth Trembles (1948); Rossellini: Stromboli (1949). After the midterm: De Sica: Bicycle Thieves (1948); De Santis: Bitter Rice (1949); De Sica: Umberto D. (1952); Lattuada:...
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ITST414 Topics in the Italian Literature and Culture of the Middle Ages in Translation Sections

Italian literature of the Middle Ages in its intellectual, socio-political and cultural context. Dante and his contemporaries and/or immediate followers (may include Petrarch and Boccaccio). Precludes credit for ITAL 404.

Instructor(s): Boccassini, Daniela
[Cross-listed with Italian 404 and Romance Studies 420C] Romance Ecologies: Narcissism, The Waste Land and Feminine Wild Wisdom This course aims at reflecting on the ways in which intuitive wisdom and linear thinking played out on the Medieval Romance scene, while improving our understanding of Medieval worldviews pertaining to the interaction between human societies and the ecosystems in which they were operating. In our readings of Medieval and Early Renaissance texts — whether chivalric narratives, love poems, philosophical treatises — and images we will also probe the extent to which, and the possible reasons why, intuitive wisdom consistently seems to bear the mark of the feminine, as a yearning for wholeness that typically, and paradoxically, exceeds institutionalized forms of knowledge and spirituality. We will carry out this investigation by keeping in mind today's ecological concerns and the way in which current ecological thinking may be enriched and enlivened by the contribution of...
Read More...

 

Summer 2018

Summer 2018

ITAL101 First-Year Italian I Sections

Grammar, reading, writing, and oral practice for beginners without previous exposure to the Italian language or dialects.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer 2018" style="accordion-style1"] First-Year Italian I The Italian 101 course, an introductory-level language and culture course, will allow students to acquire some basic grammatical structures and learn about a number of interesting cultural topics, including Italian society, visual arts and architecture, music, and art cities. To help practice and develop all four-language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) this course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach. In particular, the purpose of Italian 101 is to help students gain some proficiency in communicating in a variety of survival situations, such as talk about themselves, their family, their interests and their daily routine, address different people, describe people and places they are familiar with and express likes and dislikes. Students will learn how to appropriately pronounce the language, read short articles and simple stories; listen and understand dialogues and songs; write a postcard, a simple email message and...
Read More...

ITAL102 First-Year Italian II Sections

Grammar, reading, writing and oral practice for beginners without previous exposure to the Italian language or dialects.

[accordions collapsible=true active=false style=accordion-container] [accordion title="Course Description - Summer 2018" style="accordion-style1"] First-Year Italian II Building on Italian 101, the Italian 102 course helps students develop all four language skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking) and gain a beginner level of proficiency in interacting in Italian and communicating in situations, such as discuss people and events in the students' life, in the present and from the past, talk about their childhood or memorable trips; address different people; ask for directions and order in a restaurant; express likes and dislikes and make plans for the weekend and other occasions. The course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach and students participate in a variety of engaging and fun activities. Students will be asked to do many activities and exercises in pairs and in groups. Willingness to interact in Italian and all efforts will be rewarded! Learners will read ads, email messages, and short articles or stories, and...
Read More...

ITAL104 Italian for Singers Sections

The study of the Italian language with the study of Italian lyric diction and musical culture; practice in translation, phonetic transcription and the performance of vocal music.

Italian for Singers course The 104 Italian for Singers course integrates the study and practice of the Italian contemporary language with the study of Italian lyric diction and musical culture. It includes practice in translation, phonetic transcription and the performance of vocal music. In particular, the purpose of this course is to help students sing accurately and expressively in Italian, enhance their comprehension of Italian language, develop basic translation skills in Italian, use basic speaking skills to communicate in structured, real-life situations, in contemporary Italian and recall and describe famous Italian opera or art songs. To achieve these learning goals students will be introduced to principles of Italian lyric diction and asked to work on their knowledge of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) as a means of presenting and reinforcing the "sonic vocabulary" of the language. In-class and out-of-class activities will help students refine their awareness of vocal articulators and their effect on speech...
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Summer 2018
No ITST course(s) were found for S2018 term.