Italian Courses

 

Summer 2017

Summer 2017

ITAL101 First-Year Italian I Sections

Grammar, reading, writing, and oral practice for beginners without previous exposure to the Italian language or dialects.

Italian 101 The Italian 101 course, an introductory-level language and culture course, will allow students to acquire some basic grammatical structures and learn about a number of interesting cultural topics, including Italian society, visual arts and architecture, music, and art cities. To help practice and develop all four-language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) this course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach. In particular, the purpose of Italian 101 is to help students gain some proficiency in communicating in a variety of survival situations, such as talk about themselves, their family, their interests and their daily routine, address different people, describe people and places they are familiar with and express likes and dislikes. Students will learn how to appropriately pronounce the language, read short articles and simple stories; listen and understand dialogues and songs; write a postcard, a simple email message and a short letter in Italian and developing an appreciation for...
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ITAL102 First-Year Italian II Sections

Grammar, reading, writing and oral practice for beginners without previous exposure to the Italian language or dialects.

Italian 102 Building on Italian 101, the Italian 102 course helps students develop all four language skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking) and gain a beginner level of proficiency in interacting in Italian and communicating in situations, such as discuss people and events in the students' life, in the present and from the past, talk about their childhood or memorable trips; address different people; ask for directions and order in a restaurant; express likes and dislikes and make plans for the weekend and other occasions. The course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach and students participate in a variety of engaging and fun activities. Students will be asked to do many activities and exercises in pairs and in groups. Willingness to interact in Italian and all efforts will be rewarded! Learners will read ads, email messages, and short articles or stories, and work towards developing correct pronounciation of the language; listen and...
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ITAL104 Italian for Singers Sections

The study of the Italian language with the study of Italian lyric diction and musical culture; practice in translation, phonetic transcription and the performance of vocal music.


Summer 2017
No ITST course(s) were found for S2017 term.


Winter 2016/17

Winter 2016

ITAL101 First-Year Italian I Sections

Grammar, reading, writing, and oral practice for beginners without previous exposure to the Italian language or dialects.

Italian 101 The Italian 101 course, an introductory-level language and culture course, will allow students to acquire some basic grammatical structures and learn about a number of interesting cultural topics, including Italian society, visual arts and architecture, music, and art cities. To help practice and develop all four-language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) this course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach. In particular, the purpose of Italian 101 is to help students gain some proficiency in communicating in a variety of survival situations, such as talk about themselves, their family, their interests and their daily routine, address different people, describe people and places they are familiar with and express likes and dislikes. Students will learn how to appropriately pronounce the language, read short articles and simple stories; listen and understand dialogues and songs; write a postcard, a simple email message and a short letter in Italian and developing an appreciation for...
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ITAL102 First-Year Italian II Sections

Grammar, reading, writing and oral practice for beginners without previous exposure to the Italian language or dialects.

Instructor(s): Testa, Carlo
Italian 102 Building on Italian 101, the Italian 102 course helps students develop all four language skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking) and gain a beginner level of proficiency in interacting in Italian and communicating in situations, such as discuss people and events in the students' life, in the present and from the past, talk about their childhood or memorable trips; address different people; ask for directions and order in a restaurant; express likes and dislikes and make plans for the weekend and other occasions. The course adopts a highly interactive and communicative approach and students participate in a variety of engaging and fun activities. Students will be asked to do many activities and exercises in pairs and in groups. Willingness to interact in Italian and all efforts will be rewarded! Learners will read ads, email messages, and short articles or stories, and work towards developing correct pronounciation of the language; listen and...
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ITAL201 Second-Year Italian I Sections

Reading, writing and oral practice, with constant and systematic reference to the grammatical structure of the language.

Second-Year Italian I Italian 201 (3) and Italian 202 (3) are the second-year continuation of Italian 102. The primary aim of the courses is to consolidate students’ oral and written proficiency, to improve their reading and comprehension skills and to promote their awareness of Italian culture. To serve that purpose, the courses are complemented by an interactive approach to the review of the main Italian grammatical points, an introduction to and discussion on cultural topics, such as contemporary Italian society, stereotypes on Italian people and on Italy, Italian cuisine and others. The various assessments and evaluation methods are tied to overall course goals and objectives and are meant to help the students assess their own progress in all four language skills and on their cultural competency as well. All activities and class discussions are conducted in Italian. Students are expected to prepare the assigned material prior to coming to class and also to complete the...
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ITAL202 Second-Year Italian II Sections

Reading, writing and oral practice, with constant and systematic reference to the grammatical structure of the language.

Second-Year Italian II While Italian 202 (3) is a continuation of Italian 201 and therefore will be conducted according to the same format, it will naturally build on Italian 201 and therefore include additional communicative, reading, writing and listening skills as well as new cultural topics. Students enrolled in section 202-202 will also have the option of participating in a Community Service-Learning component and the opportunity to conduct work in Italian for the Italian community. This work will count for a percentage of the students’ final grade, and more importantly, will be a truly unique opportunity to put the language into practice. Required Texts: Rosella Bozzone Costa, Chiara Ghezzi and Monica Piantoni, Contatto 2B + CD Audio (Level B2, Common European Framework), Loescher. Prerequisite: ITAL 201 or permission of the department Language of instruction: Italian Course Registration
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ITAL301 Third-Year Italian I Sections

Reading, writing, speaking, comprehension. Special emphasis on oral practice and on composition.

Third-Year Italian I ITAL 301 aims to strengthen students’ competence in Italian and to develop effective operational proficiency in both oral and written skills. A communication-oriented approach will be used: we will work on authentic material in Italian, the language of instruction. Contemporary culture, customs and current news will be the starting point to create interest, motivation and confidence in using the language, naturally leading to a wider vocabulary, new strategies in interaction and further insights. Students will be engaged in daily class discussions and communicative activities: active participation is a requirement, together with enthusiasm, curiosity and a desire to learn. This course also provides a solid foundation for taking ITAL 401 and 402. Objectives: to develop the communicative abilities (listening, speaking, reading, writing) in Italian (intermediate-advanced level/ CEFR B2); to offer insights into the culture and daily life of Italy; to encourage positive attitudes to language learning, together with awareness and...
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ITAL302 Third-Year Italian II Sections

Reading, writing, speaking, comprehension. Special emphasis on oral practice and on composition.

Third-Year Italian II ITAL 302 aims to enhance students’ competence in Italian and to strengthen their proficiency in both oral and written skills. We will work on authentic material in Italian, the language of instruction, using a communication-oriented approach. Contemporary culture, customs and current news will be the starting point to create interest, motivation and confidence in using the language more and more effectively in real situations. A section will be dedicated to Italian for specific purposes, an individual study of the vocabulary each student is more interested in for personal or academic interest. The acquired competence in Italian will naturally lead to the further insights of ITAL 401 and 402. Objectives: to develop the communicative abilities in Italian (advanced level/ CEFR B2-C1); to offer insights into the culture and daily life of Italy; to encourage positive attitudes to language learning and an appreciation of cultural differences. Learning Outcomes: At the end of ITAL 301...
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ITAL303 Italian Literature and Culture of the Medieval and Early Modern Period Sections

A thematic approach to Italian literary works from the origins to the end of the sixteenth century considered in a broad cultural context. Alternates with ITAL 304.

Instructor(s): Boccassini, Daniela
[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 231] Shifting Identities in Medieval and Early Modern Italy This is a course that aims at blending the visual and the literary arts that flourished in the Italian peninsula from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. We will follow a chronological order, moving from Dante to Ariosto, from Giotto to Raphael and Michelangelo. However, this order also reflects a geographical one, as different centers of patronage became prominent at different moments in time. We will therefore look at Palermo and Sicily during the 12th and 13th centuries, Florence and Tuscany from the 13th to the 16th, Bologna-Ferrara-Venice in the 15th and 16th; finally, approaching the Rome of the Renaissance will also give us the opportunity to look at her ancient, classical heritage. We will read excerpts from some of the major texts that were produced in these various areas, and familiarize ourselves with the evolution of the visual arts. If...
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ITAL304 Italian Literature and Culture of the Modern and Contemporary Age Sections

The development of modern and contemporary Italian literature and culture against the background of social and historical events. Alternates with ITAL 303.

Instructor(s): Zhang, Gaoheng
This course is cancelled and has been replaced by ITAL 409.    
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ITAL401 Advanced Studies in Italian Language and Style I Sections

Advanced reading, writing, speaking, comprehension. Special emphasis on oral practice. Alternates with ITAL 402.

Advanced Studies in Italian Language and Style I This course is designed for those students who wish to review and develop their communicative competence in Italian. From the starting point of nonfictional texts, students will examine and discuss contemporary issues in their social and cultural context. The focus will be on the language we use to communicate in daily life and in the media. We will pay particular attention to Italian TV, radio broadcasts and commercials, together with lyrics of hit songs and news. Objectives: To recognize the close link between economic development and social and cultural growth, both in its general rules and local variations; to consider cultural differences, both diachronically and synchronically; to recognize the interference between different codex and languages in popular culture; to develop competence in coding/decoding media languages; to analyze and anticipate the influence of new media on contemporary society; to enhance general critical skills. Learning Outcomes: At the...
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ITAL402 Advanced Studies in Italian Language and Style II Sections

Advanced reading, writing, speaking, comprehension. Special emphasis on composition. Alternates with ITAL 401.

Advanced Studies in Italian Language and Style II Designed as the natural continuation of ITAL401, this course is for those students who wish to enhance their communicative competence in Italian. From the starting point of nonfictional texts, students will examine and discuss contemporary issues in their social and cultural context. The focus will be on the language we use to communicate in daily life and in the media. We will pay particular attention to Italian TV, radio broadcasts and commercials, together with lyrics of hit songs and news. Objectives: To recognize the close link between economic development and social and cultural growth, both in its general rules and local variations; to consider cultural differences both diachronically and synchronically; to recognize the interference between different codex and languages in popular culture; to analyze commonplaces/clichés and national stereotypes in the age of globalization; to enhance general critical skills. Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course,...
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ITAL404 Italian Literature of the Middle Ages Sections

Italian literature of the Middle Ages in its intellectual, socio-political and cultural context. Dante and his contemporaries and/or immediate followers (may include Petrarch and Boccaccio). Precludes credit for ITST 414.

[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 414, Romance Studies 420C, and Religion, Literature and The Arts 471] The World in the Eye of the Beloved: Love and Consciousness in the Mediterranean Middle Ages The 11th to 13th centuries produced some of the most intense, sublime and passionate poetry to be found in the Western tradition, and beyond. Throughout the Mediterranean, love poetry became one of the privileged portals to access a holistic experience of life. In and through their yearning for the Beloved, poets addressed our inborn desire for meaning, fulfillment, perfect happiness. Who is the Beloved, then, what does s/he reveal to the lover, and where does the “learning of the heart”, which the experience of love so understood entails, lead to? In this course we will: read (in English translation) and discuss a number of poetic texts pertaining to the love experience from the Medieval Provençal, Italian, Hispanic, Islamic, and Indian worlds; evaluate...
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ITAL409 Topics in Modern and Contemporary Italian Literature and Culture Sections

Italian literature of the 20th century in its intellectual, socio-political and cultural context. Precludes credit for ITST 419.

Instructor(s): Zhang, Gaoheng
[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 419] Virilities, Italian Style This course offers an overview of diverse Italian masculinities as they are represented in modern and contemporary Italian literature and culture. What does it mean to be a man in Italy? How have diverse concepts of Italian manhood come into being? How have they been constructed and distributed in literary and other cultural texts? What do they tell us about Italian society? And how have they been challenged, or even subverted, within the Italian cultural domain? We will probe these questions by studying the depictions of Italian manliness in key memoirs, dramas, novels, public speeches, news articles, and films from the eighteenth century to the present. Male archetypes and ideals to be scrutinized include libertines, “servants of two masters,” nationalist soldiers, the inetto (schlemiel), the fascist new man, the gallo (literally, “rooster”), coming-of-age stories, gay identity, the Latin Lover, and the self-made man. To delve...
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ITAL420H Special Topics in Italian Language, Literature and Culture - ITAL LNG/LIT/CUL Sections

Course content will vary. May be taken twice for a total of 6 credits.

[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 421H] Cultural Crossings Between Italy and China Over the centuries, crossings between Italy and China have produced the most sustained, and arguably the most influential, strand of cultural texts on East-West borrowings. France and Britain also contributed significantly to European understandings and imagination of modern China. This course examines the evolution of Italian perspectives on China through significant literary, cinematic, and media texts of Italians’ real and fantastical travels in China and of Chinese immigration to Italy. French and British sources will also be studied mainly for comparative purposes. The aim of the course is to analyze the contexts, ways, and reasons for which specific knowledge about China was produced, interpreted, and negotiated in Italy. Central themes we consider include the notions of the other and the self, the center and the border, boundary space, hybrid cultural identities, ethnic essentialism, and intercultural communication. To this end, we journey through...
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Winter 2016

ITST231 Introduction to Italian Culture I: From the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period Sections

Instructor(s): Boccassini, Daniela
[Cross-listed with Italian 303] Shifting Identities in Medieval and Early Modern Italy This is a course that aims at blending the visual and the literary arts that flourished in the Italian peninsula from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. We will follow a chronological order, moving from Dante to Ariosto, from Giotto to Raphael and Michelangelo. However, this order also reflects a geographical one, as different centers of patronage became prominent at different moments in time. We will therefore look at Palermo and Sicily during the 12th and 13th centuries, Florence and Tuscany from the 13th to the 16th, Bologna-Ferrara-Venice in the 15th and 16th; finally, approaching the Rome of the Renaissance will also give us the opportunity to look at her ancient, classical heritage. We will read excerpts from some of the major texts that were produced in these various areas, and familiarize ourselves with the evolution of the visual arts. If you...
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ITST345 Italian Fascism in Interdisciplinary Perspective Sections

The cultural, literary, philosophical roots of Fascism and its evolution: its policies in literature, sports, cinema, architecture, racial legislation, and colonial adventures.

Instructor(s): Testa, Carlo
[Cross-listed with Romance Studies 222] Types and Archetypes of Fascism in the Age of Crisis of Liberal Democracy This course aims at offering students with diverse backgrounds some foundational knowledge about the phenomenon of “xxx-ism” as, in successive incarnations, it arose and ran its course in the context of neo-Latin societies and cultures. Since the phenomenon originated in Italy, our primary focus will be the Italian peninsula. We will read Neville and make references to Bosworth, Mack Smith, Martin Clark, Procacci and other contemporary historians and sociologists. We will analyze works of theory, politics, fiction and memoirs from that age (by Marinetti, Moravia, Pirandello, Ungaretti, Carlo Levi); examine the architecture and fine arts of Mussolini's regime; and watch clips from films belonging to the genres of telefoni bianchi comedy (Camerini's Il Signor Max), war propaganda (Balbo's transatlantic flights, Rossellini's The White Ship) and historical “peplum” kolossals (Gallone's Scipio the African). Ultimately, the goal of...
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ITST385 Italian Cinema: Neorealism Sections

Instructor(s): Testa, Carlo
[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 432] From Rossellini to Fellini: Neorealism and its Legacy in Italian Cinema In the rubble-strewn world of the immediate post-Second World War period, the films by Rossellini, Visconti, De Santis and De Sica (and the scripts by Zavattini) amounted to a landmark event and established Italian Neorealism as a worldwide cause célèbre. This artistic movement, exemplary both in aesthetic achievements and ethical commitment, proved to reverberate durably in time. It influenced successive waves of younger Italian filmmakers who later became great auteurs in their own right; and it travelled widely in space, with an enormous impact on filmmakers the world over. The topics covered are the following. Before the midterm: General intro to the class; Italian cinema under Fascism; Rossellini: Rome Open City (1945); Rossellini: Paisan (1946); Visconti: The Earth Trembles (1948); Rossellini: Stromboli (1949). After the midterm: De Sica: Bicycle Thieves (1948); De Santis: Bitter Rice (1949); De Sica:...
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ITST414 Topics in the Italian Literature and Culture of the Middle Ages in Translation Sections

Italian literature of the Middle Ages in its intellectual, socio-political and cultural context. Dante and his contemporaries and/or immediate followers (may include Petrarch and Boccaccio). Precludes credit for ITAL 404.

[Cross-listed with Italian 404, Romance Studies 420C, and Religion, Literature and The Arts 471] The World in the Eye of the Beloved: Love and Consciousness in the Mediterranean Middle Ages The 11th to 13th centuries produced some of the most intense, sublime and passionate poetry to be found in the Western tradition, and beyond. Throughout the Mediterranean, love poetry became one of the privileged portals to access a holistic experience of life. In and through their yearning for the Beloved, poets addressed our inborn desire for meaning, fulfillment, perfect happiness. Who is the Beloved, then, what does s/he reveal to the lover, and where does the “learning of the heart”, which the experience of love so understood entails, lead to? In this course we will: read (in English translation) and discuss a number of poetic texts pertaining to the love experience from the Medieval Provençal, Italian, Hispanic, Islamic, and Indian worlds; evaluate some...
Read More...

ITST419 Topics in Modern and Contemporary Italian Literature and Culture in Translation Sections

Italian literature of the 20th century in its intellectual, socio-political and cultural context. Precludes credit for ITAL 409.

Instructor(s): Zhang, Gaoheng
[Cross-listed with Italian 409] Virilities, Italian Style This course offers an overview of diverse Italian masculinities as they are represented in modern and contemporary Italian literature and culture. What does it mean to be a man in Italy? How have diverse concepts of Italian manhood come into being? How have they been constructed and distributed in literary and other cultural texts? What do they tell us about Italian society? And how have they been challenged, or even subverted, within the Italian cultural domain? We will probe these questions by studying the depictions of Italian manliness in key memoirs, dramas, novels, public speeches, news articles, and films from the eighteenth century to the present. Male archetypes and ideals to be scrutinized include libertines, “servants of two masters,” nationalist soldiers, the inetto (schlemiel), the fascist new man, the gallo (literally, “rooster”), coming-of-age stories, gay identity, the Latin Lover, and the self-made man. To delve further...
Read More...

ITST421H Special Topics in Italian Studies - SPL TPCS ITAL ST Sections

Course content will vary. May be taken twice for a total of 6 credits.

[Cross-listed with Italian 420H] Cultural Crossings Between Italy and China Over the centuries, crossings between Italy and China have produced the most sustained, and arguably the most influential, strand of cultural texts on East-West borrowings. France and Britain also contributed significantly to European understandings and imagination of modern China. This course examines the evolution of Italian perspectives on China through significant literary, cinematic, and media texts of Italians’ real and fantastical travels in China and of Chinese immigration to Italy. French and British sources will also be studied mainly for comparative purposes. The aim of the course is to analyze the contexts, ways, and reasons for which specific knowledge about China was produced, interpreted, and negotiated in Italy. Central themes we consider include the notions of the other and the self, the center and the border, boundary space, hybrid cultural identities, ethnic essentialism, and intercultural communication. To this end, we journey through four...
Read More...

ITST432 Italian Cinema and Its Cultural Background Sections

Films with English subtitles. Precludes credit for ITAL 430. Course content will vary. May be taken twice for a total of 6 credits.

Instructor(s): Testa, Carlo
[Cross-listed with Italian Studies 385] From Rossellini to Fellini: Neorealism and its Legacy in Italian Cinema In the rubble-strewn world of the immediate post-Second World War period, the films by Rossellini, Visconti, De Santis and De Sica (and the scripts by Zavattini) amounted to a landmark event and established Italian Neorealism as a worldwide cause célèbre. This artistic movement, exemplary both in aesthetic achievements and ethical commitment, proved to reverberate durably in time. It influenced successive waves of younger Italian filmmakers who later became great auteurs in their own right; and it travelled widely in space, with an enormous impact on filmmakers the world over. The topics covered are the following. Before the midterm: General intro to the class; Italian cinema under Fascism; Rossellini: Rome Open City (1945); Rossellini: Paisan (1946); Visconti: The Earth Trembles (1948); Rossellini: Stromboli (1949). After the midterm: De Sica: Bicycle Thieves (1948); De Santis: Bitter Rice (1949); De Sica:...
Read More...